Archive for the ‘English’ Category

Once again, women are literally erased from history. Sometimes it’s hard to believe this still happens in the 21st Century.

And then I remember just with what we’re dealing here (men and their frail egos) and stop being surprised.

Una vez más las mujeres son, literalmente, borradas de la historia. A veces me cuesta trabajo creer que en pleno siglo 21 esto siga ocurriendo.
Y luego recuerdo con quién estamos tratando (los hombres y su frágil ego) y dejo de soprenderme.

Feminist Philosophers

The History of Philosophy as a giant poster, but without women (again)..

It just oughtn’t to be acceptable anymore for members of the profession to react to this depiction of the history of our discipline without protest.

Significant or interesting philosophers of the past were NOT all men, and even if women were a minority, it is not such a small minority that it couldn’t show in a pictorial representation.

I am not saying that the creator of the poster is to blame, but that we, as professional philosophers, should probably not consider using this as a teaching resource.

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A very interesting blog post regarding “Alpha wolves” and why biology just-doesn’t-work-that-way. As someone who majored in biology (although I’m specialized in molecular biology and genetics), I find myself cringing every time I read the same paranormal tropes about this now subverted ideas about wolves. Please authors, go and read an updated paper on the subjects before you start writing about “hierarchy” in the animal kingdom. Science may try to be objective, but scientists are still human beings, full of biases and prejudices.

shattersnipe: malcontent & rainbows

Regardless of what historical epoch their populations and culture are either based on or situated in, epic fantasy landscapes tend to be populated by a very specific subset of animals: big cats, horses, wolves, bears, deer, birds of prey, European livestock (cattle, sheep, chickens), domestic pets, rabbits, and dragons. Though you might occasionally find some ferrets, snakes or crocodiles to spice things up, generally speaking, there’s a profound Eurocentrism to the kind of animals you’ll encounter in fantasy novels, partly because the default fantasy environment is itself Eurocentric; and partly because, once you’re using less common animals, there’s the joint question of how to describe and reference them if their English names are either very clearly colonial or derive their meaning from a clearly real-world scientific canon (Thompson’s gazelle, the red panda, the Pallas cat, for instance); but mostly, I suspect, because we view such creatures as being universally generic…

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Thanks (but no thanks…).

Zoe Smith, you are awesome and I love you. *Ahem* This comes from someone who refuses to buy into the “inherent female weakness” paradigm.

[Zoe Smith eres genal y the amo. *Ahem* Esto viene de alguien quien se rehusa a creer en el paradigma de la “debilidad femenina inherente”.]

Basically why I cringe every time someones accuses a woman (or a female character) of being too “manly”, “too much like a man” or “one of the boys”.

Dusk Is Falling

For thousands of years any time a woman did something a man thought inappropriate she was accused of wanting to be a man, of being too mannish, of being unwomanly. We are still fighting this same battle today, ironically backed up by liberal progressive pseudo-science that agrees there are ways of really behaving like a man or a woman.

When we examine the history of this struggle, we find it written about in curious ways. There will be innocuous sentences like, ‘in the past it was thought inappropriate for women to work outside the home, but gradually greater numbers of women became accepted into the workforce’. This is not an actual quote, you understand, but a stand-in for thousands that I’ve read just like it. Not only does it obscure the agent (just WHO thought it was inappropriate for women to work outside the home) but it also obscures the…

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Posted: February 3, 2013 in English, Feminism, Rants
Tags: , , ,

This is a blog post that really spoke to me, in many ways, not just in relation to the Butch/Femme discussion, which I really don’t feel like addressing right now, because I don’t considerer myself with enough knowledge to do a proper commentary.

I’m someone who struggles with her identity everyday. While I do like some thing that are considered “feminine” (in a sort-of arbitrary way, why things have to be categorized?) I always refused the feminine gender role assigned to me, trying to foolishly be just “myself”. Some people think that any woman or girl who doesn’t conform is less of a woman, is trying to be “one of the boys”, is just a “man with boobs”, is a “misogynist” , they simply can’t fathom the idea. I have been called  names again and again by supposed “feminists” and “allies”.

This may not have to do much with the discussion at hand, but I’m sick and tired of people complaining about women who just don’t care to perform, I’m sick of having to excuse myself because I simply don’t want to have kids or get married or even have a partner (Bitch! Woman-hater! Marriage is a natural female occupation didn’t you know?*).

Just need to get that off my chest.

*Yes, I once got into an argument with someone that apparently thinks that any woman who doesn’t care about marriage is a misogynist. Good times.

ann tagonist

With words, I like to know exactly what they mean and use them appropriately. This is why I use the word “man” to describe an adult biological male, even if he has glitter on his face and calls himself a dyke. 

There has been a lot of discussion lately, on Facebook and on the blogosphere, about ‘Butch’ as an identity and whether this is compatible with radical feminist politics. So what does ‘Butch’ mean? Let’s ask some people.

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A must read.

Radfem Hub

Radical feminism, by definition, seeks to dis-cover and examine the root of women’s global oppression by men, and the sources of male power.  In our work, we have discovered that there are several key themes that appear over and over, and which transcend time and place — this is evidence that women’s oppression by men is class-based, that is, that women as a sexual class, around the world, share the experience of being oppressed by men because we are women.

In this series, republished in part from Radfem-ological Images, we present 17 themes for discussion and analysis.  Like all radical feminists previously and presently, we do this because it is the truth, and radical feminists accept the truth no matter what it is, especially the truths about women’s lives and what men do to us.

In Part Two, we present the following themes: Male entitlement; Mansplaining/women’s perspective is wrong…

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You think I just don't understand, but I don't believe you.

As Females, we have devoted much time to supporting Trans* causes. Why are we doing this, when it seems clear that Trans* does not extend us the same respect?

Abortion: Here. Here. Here. Here. Here.

Free Speech: Here. Here.

Rape: Here.

Birth Control: Here.

Add your own links to comments, articles and the assorted detritus of the Internet where Trans* people make it very clear that they don’t give a flying fuck for Females.

We need to change this.

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